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Continuing with our discussion of personality types in the workplace, we will be taking a look at INFJs. Learning about the various Myers-Briggs personality types will help you as a colleague, manager, or business owner, work with the different personalities that you encounter. As a person, understanding how you work best and the variety of jobs and roles you’re best suited for will help you choose a career that you enjoy. Read on for an overview of the Advocate, INFJs.

INFJ = Introverted iNtuition Feeling Judging

Careers:

INFJs make up less than one percent of the population, making this personality type one of the rarest of the bunch. Advocates are most passionate about helping others, especially when they can help others find a solution that allows them to progress on their own. Advocates need a career that allows them to think creatively and express their insight in a meaningful way; one in which they will ultimately help others grow personally and professionally. This personality type will often find that corporate career paths are not the most ideal avenues.

Working with an INFJ:

Advocates are likely to become friends with their colleagues pretty quickly in the workplace, often viewed as positive individuals that are easily able to identify others’ motives and diffuse conflict and tension before it becomes a larger issue. While they are eager to help others and willing to take on additional tasks, at the end of the day, they are still introverts and require working on their own from time to time.

Managing an INFJ:

INFJs are hardworking and trustworthy, and if their managers recognize they are perfectly capable of handling their responsibilities, they will appreciate the ability to work on their own. If they are micromanaged and stuck to hard rules, however, they can become bitter, especially when their ideas and actions are criticized.

INFJ as a Manager:

This personality type is more likely to see those they manage as equals rather than subordinates. This isn’t to say they will not hold their employees to a standard. While they work hard to inspire and coach their employees, they in return, expect their employees to be just as reliable and motivated as them.